Clinical Staging

 

Biomarkers and clinical staging in psychiatry

PATRICK MCGORRY, MATCHERI KESHAVAN, SHERILYN GOLDSTONE, PAUL AMMINGER, KELLY ALLOTT, MICHAEL BERK, SUZIE LAVOIE, CHRISTOS PANTELIS, ALISON YUNG, STEPHEN WOOD, IAN HICKIE

Here, we present a clinical staging model for severe mental disorders and discuss  examples of biological markers that have already undergone some systematic evaluation and that could be integrated into such a framework. The  advantage of this model is that it explicitly considers the evolution of psychopathology during the development of a mental illness and emphasizes that progression of illness is by no means inevitable, but can be altered by providing appropriate interventions that target individual modifiable risk and protective factors.


Paolo Fusar-Poli, Patrick D. McGorry, John M. Kane

Outcomes of psychotic disorders are associated with high personal, familiar, societal and clinical burden. There is thus an urgent clinical and societal need for improving those outcomes. Recent advances in research knowledge have opened new opportunities for ameliorating outcomes of psychosis during its early clinical stages. This paper critically reviews these opportunities, summarizing the state-of-the-art knowledge and focusing on recent discoveries and future avenues for first episode research and clinical interventions.